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restoration and hazardous fuel reduction

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Long-term efficacy of fuel reduction and restoration treatments in Northern Rockies dry forests

Year of Publication
2024
Publication Type

Fuel and restoration treatments seeking to mitigate the likelihood of uncharacteristic high-severity wildfires in forests with historically frequent, low-severity fire regimes are increasingly common, but long-term treatment effects on fuels, aboveground carbon, plant community structure, ecosystem resilience, and other ecosystem attributes are understudied.

Spatially and socially segmenting private landowner motivations, properties, and management: A typology for the wildland urban interface

Year of Publication
2015
Publication Type

Throughout North America, rapid exurban development is increasing the spatial extent and population density of the wildland urban interface (WUI), exacerbating problems of wildfire risk and biodiversity loss. To address these issues, policy and planning tools need to be targeted toward different types of WUI landowners in the different types of landscape locations they occupy.

Effects of salvage logging and pile-and-burn on fuel loading, potential fire behavior, fuel consumption and emissions

Year of Publication
2013
Publication Type

We used a combination of field measurements and simulation modelling to quantify the effects of salvage logging, and a combination of salvage logging and pile-and-burn fuel surface fuel treatment (treatment combination), on fuel loadings, fire behaviour, fuel consumption and pollutant emissions at three points in time: post-windstorm (before salvage logging), post-salvage logging and post-surfa

Soil heating during burning of forest slash piles and wood piles

Year of Publication
2013
Publication Type

Pile burning of conifer slash is a common fuel reduction practice in forests of the western United States that has a direct, yet poorly quantified effect on soil heating. To address this knowledge gap, we measured the heat pulse beneath hand-built piles ranging widely in fuel composition and pile size in sandy-textured soils of the Lake Tahoe Basin.

Using native annual plants to restore post-fire habitats in western North America

Year of Publication
2013
Publication Type

Increasing fire frequencies and uncharacteristic severe fires have created a need for improved restoration methods across rangelands in western North America. Traditional restoration seed mixtures of native perennial mid- to late-seral plant species may not be suitable for intensely burned sites that have been returned to an early-seral condition.