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Fire Effects and Fire Ecology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 223

Indigenous pyrodiversity promotes plant diversity

Year of Publication
2024
Publication Type

Pyrodiversity (temporally and spatially diverse fire histories) is thought to promote biodiversity by increasing environmental heterogeneity and replicating Indigenous fire regimes, yet studies of pyrodiversity-biodiversity relationships from areas under active Indigenous fire stewardship are rare.

Estimating the influence of field inventory sampling intensity on forest landscape model performance for determining high-severity wildfire risk

Year of Publication
2024
Publication Type

Historically, fire has been essential in Southwestern US forests. However, a century of fire-exclusion and changing climate created forests which are more susceptible to uncharacteristically severe wildfires. Forest managers use a combination of thinning and prescribed burning to reduce forest density to help mitigate the risk of high-severity fires.

Fire-driven animal evolution in the Pyrocene

Year of Publication
2023
Publication Type

Fire regimes are a major agent of evolution in terrestrial animals. Changing fire regimes and the capacity for rapid evolution in wild animal populations suggests the potential for rapid, fire-driven adaptive animal evolution in the Pyrocene.

Atmospheric turbulence and wildland fires: a review

Year of Publication
2023
Publication Type

The behaviour of wildland fires and the dispersion of smoke from those fires can be strongly influenced by atmospheric turbulent flow. The science to support that assertion has developed and evolved over the past 100+ years, with contributions from laboratory and field observations, as well as modelling experiments.

Terrestrial carbon dynamics in an era of increasing wildfire

Year of Publication
2023
Publication Type
In an increasingly flammable world, wildfire is altering the terrestrial carbon balance. However, the degree to which novel wildfire regimes disrupt biological function remains unclear. Here, we synthesize the current understanding of above- and belowground processes that govern carbon loss and recovery across diverse ecosystems.