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Posch T, Koster O, Salcher MM, Pernthaler J. Harmful filamentous cyanobacteria favoured by reduced water turnover with lake warming. Nature Climate Change. 2012;2(11):5. Available at: http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/v2/n11/full/nclimate1581.html.
McEvoy A, Kerns BK, Kim JB. Hazards of Risk: Identifying Plausible Community Wildfire Disasters in Low-Frequency Fire Regimes. forests. 2021;12(7).
McEvoy A, Kerns BK, Kim JB. Hazards of Risk: Identifying Plausible Community Wildfire Disasters in Low-Frequency Fire Regimes. forests. 2021;12(7).
Bowman DMJS. Human exposure and sensitivity to globally extreme wildfire events Williamson GJ, ed. Nature Ecology & Evolution. 2017;1.
Syphard AD. Human presence diminishes the importance of climate in driving fire activity across the United States Keeley JE, ed. PNAS. 2017;114(52).
Abatzoglou JT. Human-related ignitions concurrent with high winds promote large wildfires across the USA Balch JK, ed. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 2018;Online early.
I
Fischer PA, Kline JD, Charnley S, Olsen C. Identifying policy target groups with qualitative and quantitative methods: the case of wildfire risk on nonindustrial private forest lands. Forest Policy and Economics. 2013;28.
Kreye JK. The impact of aging on laboratory fire behaviour in masticated shrub fuelbeds of California and Oregon, USA Varner MJ, ed. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 2016;Online early.
Kreye JK. The impact of aging on laboratory fire behaviour in masticated shrub fuelbeds of California and Oregon, USA Varner MJ, ed. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 2016;Online early.
Kreye JK. The impact of aging on laboratory fire behaviour in masticated shrub fuelbeds of California and Oregon, USA Varner MJ, ed. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 2016;Online early.
Kerns BK. The importance of disturbance by fire and other abiotic and biotic factors in driving cheatgrass invasion varies based on invasion stage Day MA, ed. Biological Invasions. 2017;19(6).
Kalashnikov DA, Schnell JL, Abatzoglou JT, Swain DL, Singh D. Increasing co-occurrence of fine particulate matter and ground-level ozone extremes in the western United States. Science Advances. 2022;8.PDF icon Kalashnikov et al_2022_Fine Particulate Matter.pdf (3.24 MB)
Roos CI, Guiterman CH, Margolis EQ, et al. Indigenous fire management and cross-scale fire-climate relationships in the Southwest United States from 1500 to 1900 CE. Science Advances. 2022;8(49). Available at: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciadv.abq3221.PDF icon Roos et al_2022_ScienceAdvances_Indigenous fire mgmt and cross-scale fire-climate relationships in the SW US 1500 to 1900 CE.pdf (1.46 MB)
Nelson ZJ, Weisberg PJ, Kitchen SG. Influence of climate and environment on post-fire recovery of mountain sagbrush. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 2013;On-line early.
Downing WM. Influence of fire refugia spatial pattern on post-fire forest recovery in Oregon’s Blue Mountains Krawchuk MA, ed. Landscape Ecology. 2019. Available at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10980-019-00802-1.
Hand M. The influence of incident management teams on the deployment of wildfire suppression resources Katuwal H, ed. International Journal of Wildland Fire. 2017;26(7).
Tepley AJ. Influences of fire–vegetation feedbacks and post‐fire recovery rates on forest landscape vulnerability to altered fire regimes Thomann E, ed. Journal of Ecology. 2018.
Schoennagel TL. Insights from wildfire science: a resource for fire policy discussions. (Morgan P, ed.).; 2016:9 p. Available at: https://www.frames.gov/catalog/21445.
Temperli C. Interactions among spruce beetle disturbance, climate change and forest dynamics captured by a forest landscape model Veblen TT, ed. Ecosphere. 2015;6(11).
Kerns BK. Invasive grasses: A new perfect storm for forested ecosystems? Tortorelli C, ed. Forest Ecology and Management. 2020;463.

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