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10/22/2018 Klondike Fire Update (Klondike Fire Wildfire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 22, 2018 - 7:42am
Klondike Fire West Zone – With yesterday’s heavy smoke inversion and decreased fire behavior, firefighters supported by a dozer were able to use direct tactics on the southwest corner of the recent expansion area, east of 3577 Road. As the smoke cleared in the afternoon the effort was reinforced with helicopter bucket work. Firefighters utilized hand ignition to deepen containment lines in the Burnt Ridge area. Firefighters continued to mop-up the large spot fire, with the smaller spot fires in patrol status. Today, crews will mop-up along the deepened containment line on Burnt Ridge (2308 Road). Additional lighting may occur if conditions are favorable. Hand crews and heavy equipment, supported by air resources, will continue to go direct and check the fire’s spread in the southwest corner of the expansion area below 3577 Road. Engines will patrol Oak Flat, Old House, and other areas still under evacuation notice with both day and night shifts. With the significantly reduced...

10/21/2018 Klondike Fire Update (Klondike Fire Wildfire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 21, 2018 - 8:10am
Klondike Fire West Zone – Favorable weather conditions yesterday allowed firefighters to make good progress across the fire. Firefighters utilized strategic burn operations along Burnt Ridge to secure the tie-in of the fire-line along the 2308 road. Mop up has already begun on portions of the road. The spot fire on Spud Road is now in monitor and patrol status. All spot fires from Sunday’s wind event have been lined and fire is within control lines on all flanks. Where access permits, crews continue to lay hose, bringing water where it is needed, as crews work to strengthen hand-lines. Any smoke seen on the west side of the fire was from interior pockets or burnout operations. Full suppression remains the highest priority. Fire crews will emphasize direct fire-line construction and continue mop-up on the spot fires in the coming days. Crews will continue controlled burn operations south of the 2308 road to increase the depth of existing control lines in preparation for the...

10/20/2018 Klondike Fire Update (Klondike Fire Wildfire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 20, 2018 - 8:03am
Klondike Fire West Zone – Incident commanders are utilizing a multi-tiered approach to fully suppress this fire.Firefighters took advantage of favorable weather yesterday and overnight to continue the controlled burn operation on Burnt Ridge and along 2308 road. The operation was successful and resulted in a low intensityunderstory burn. Burn operations will continue today and tonight as weather allows.Air support was utilized extensively and successfully to control areas of active fire. Air tankers dropped retardant as requested by ground crews and helicopters dropped water as needed. These resources will continue to be available today as long as weather and visibility remain favorable.Engine and hand crews continue the difficult work of attacking the fire on the ground. Engine crews are using hose lays to get water on the fire when access allows. Meanwhile hand crews are working with chainsaws, shovels and other hand tools to remove fuel ahead of the fire.Fire Weather: Today’s...

Discover Teanaway: Developing a Recreation Plan for the State’s First Community Forest

WA DNR News - October 19, 2018 - 4:23pm

Fall has settled in across Washington and nowhere is that more evident than beneath the trees in Teanaway Community Forest.

The sun cast a warm glow across the landscape through a kaleidoscope of yellow, red, and fiery orange leaves on Friday afternoon for gathering members of the Teanaway Community Forest Advisory Committee.

Over the past 18 months, the departments of Natural Resources (DNR) and Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and the committee developed a supplemental recreation plan for Teanaway to be included in the community forest’s management plan developed in 2015.

The recreation plan puts opportunity on the page for hiking, camping, mountain biking, horseback riding, scenic driving, and motorcycling, as well as fishing, hunting, and nature activities. It will serve as a guide for the management of recreation and public access in the Teanaway over the next 15 years.

On Oct. 24, the plan will enter a two-week State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) comment period—one of the final steps in the development process. The agencies and committee anticipate adopting the recreation plan in early December.

“The Teanaway is a special place that means a lot to people – that was evident throughout the planning process,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz. “They’ve helped develop an environmentally responsible recreation plan that will shape family and outdoor adventures in the Teanaway for generations to come.”

Commissioner Franz leads DNR in managing 1,100 miles of trails and 160-plus recreation sites in 3 million acres of working forest state trust lands and 92 natural areas.

As more members of the committee arrived to talk about the final phases of the recreation plan, two riders saddled up their gaited horses for an afternoon ride and a family returned from a hike along the Middle Fork Teanaway River with their dogs. Even on a workday, people found time to escape into Teanaway.

Teanaway has a long history of impact for generations of humans who have looked to it as a jewel in Central Washington—there is evidence of Native Americans inhabiting the area 11,500 years ago.

In 2013, the state legislature established Teanaway as the state’s first community forest. The advisory committee assembled to assist DNR and DFW in developing a management plan. They completed the plan in 2015—though it didn’t include a recreation plan yet. Everyone decided that would take a little more time to get right.

“So many people have a tie to the Teanaway and everyone who comes here just falls in love with it,” Larry Leach, Southeast Region assistant manager, said. “Making this place a better forest—and that includes everything in the forest—that’s what’s rewarding and why we put so much effort into this.”

The agencies and committee spent 18 months listening to extensive community input and developing a plan that identified recreation opportunities that were compatible with the priority of conservation and restoration of the upper Yakima Basin as part of the Yakima Basin Integrated Water Resource Management Plan.

“It’s been a remarkable group of 20 of us who come from many different walks of life and many interest areas,” Martha Wyckoff, neighboring landowner and committee member, said. “We’re not all of one like mind but we’ve come to find the civic process to be very rewarding. We worked well together to serve the community, serve the forest, and create a plan that we believe will be great for this community for the next 15 of years.”

Throughout the process, one thing became abundantly clear: People love and care deeply for Teanaway.

In the summer of 2017, more than 2,600 people participated in a survey to provide input and ideas regarding recreational opportunity in Teanaway.

The agencies and committee developed a “word cloud” depicting the most common words and phrases used in the survey participants’ responses. The more common the word, the larger it appears.

Hunting, trails, riding, camping, hiking, wildlife, great, quiet, beautiful, family—that’s what Teanaway represents for users.

The agencies and committee had their work cut out for them.

Planning for the seasons

The recreation plan addresses the seasonal variations presented by the area and separates its overall management strategies into two seasonal groups: “Spring, Summer, and Fall” and “Winter”.

The agencies and committee opted for this route after looking at biological, soil, geologic, and management constraints across the landscape throughout the year. This approach considers the needs of wildlife during some seasons and threats of soil erosion and damage to river floodplains in others. Ultimately, these primary management objectives come together to managing sustainable trails, camping areas, and trailheads.

“We’ve worked hard to make sure recreational uses are compatible with watershed protection and other values that were identified in the overall management plan,” said WDFW Director Kelly Susewind.

The advisory committee originally assembled to develop the 2015 Teanaway Community Forest Management Plan, so the members had a strong understanding of the five guiding goals for management in the area:

  • Protect and enhance the water supply and protect the watershed
  • Maintain working lands for forestry and grazing while protecting key watershed functions and aquatic habitat
  • Maintain and where possible expand recreational opportunities consistent with watershed protection, for activities such as hiking, fishing, hunting, horseback riding, camping, birding, and snowmobiling
  • Conserve and restore vital habitat for fish, including steelhead, spring Chinook, and bull trout, and wildlife, including deer, elk, large predators, and spotted owls
  • Support a strong community partnership, in which the Yakama Nation, residents, business owners, local governments, conservation groups, and others provide advice about ongoing land management

“They offered up solutions that helped us balance the habitat needs and the water quality needs and the restoration intent of the forest,” Leach said. “Really, the outcome of the plan is to improve what is already here for recreation and sustain what already is an incredible place to come and play.”

Perhaps the coolest part about recreation in Teanaway is the partnerships that have allowed the opportunity for visitors to discover different towns and landscapes during their adventures.

From the U.S. Forest Service providing connections to multi-use trails in Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest to the non-motorized trails stretching over Cle Elum Ridge to the communities of Cle Elum, Roslyn and Ronald, collaboration between agencies will play a big roll connecting recreationists to opportunities for play across this incredible landscape.

Spring, Summer, and Fall Concept

The priorities for Spring, Summer, and Fall primarily focus on non-motorized recreation. It includes hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, camping, fishing, hunting, and nature activities. However, it also establishes a scenic driving route for motorized fun.

Doug McClelland, DNR Teanaway recreation Planning, looks at the Summer recreation in the draft recreation plan.

The scenic driving routes will follow forest roads from Indian Camp to the North Fork Teanaway Road, giving recreationists beautiful views of the Teanaway Butte area and restoration activities along Lick Creek. These routes will also enhance connections at Jack Creek Road to Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest and Hwy 97.

In addition to the scenic driving route, the plan outlines zones for trail development—including trailheads with parking, restrooms, and information kiosks.

Recreationists can also expect to see improvements at the Teanaway, 29 Pines, and Indian Camp camping areas.

Winter

For the winter months, the recreation plan outlines enhanced groomed motorized and non-motorized trails with opportunities for dispersed snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, and snowshoeing.

This includes zones for a snowmobile area to enhance the groomed snowmobile trail network, and a non-motorized winter recreation area for non-motorized winter activities and sports. Sno-parks will be located at 29 Pines camp area for access to the snowmobile area and at the West Teanaway camp area for access to the non-motorized winter recreation area.

Warming Huts will be developed and managed in cooperation with user groups.

Get involved

From those who volunteered to be on the committee to help develop management and recreation for generations to come to the community members who have attended meetings to share their ideas and insights, it’s evident that Teanaway is a special place to people across the state.

Now, there’s one more chance to get involved and share your thoughts.

Community members and recreationists are invited to attend the comment period kick-off meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 24 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Putnam Centennial Center in Cle Elum. Attendees will have an opportunity to learn about the concepts, priorities, strategies, and tools from the planning effort and learn how to comment during the environmental review.

The recreation plan begins its SEPA review on Oct. 24 and will be open for comment through Nov. 7.

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When a vineyard gives you more than good wine

WA DNR News - October 19, 2018 - 10:57am

In the high desert, Red Mountain stands above vineyards growing hundreds of acres, harvesting some of the best grapes in the state — leading some to call it The Napa Valley of Washington.

“It’s the slopes, it’s the elevation, and then it’s the soils,” said Quintessence and Shaw’s Vineyard Manager Marshall Edwards, who is a decades-long expert deep appreciation for the mountain’s terrain.

Marshall Edwards has worked as vineyard operations manager for nearly 20 years for Shaw and Quintessence Vineyards.

“These ancient soils brought in from the Missoula Flood that swirled around Red Mountain and deposited in here that are so rich … It’s the combination of those three things that make it so special,” he said.

Red Mountain isn’t just an American Viticultural Area (AVA) — a federal designation that recognizes a region for wine growing — but part of it is public trust land, which is owned by Washington State Department of Natural Resources.

 

 

DNR gives agriculture leases out to private businesses, and in turn, generates $24 million annually that goes to funding public services.

“Most of the revenue generated goes to the public trust, so the Common School Construction Fund, and another small portion is leasehold tax, and that tax goes back to the county in lieu of property taxes,” said DNR Land Manager Tim Kopf. “So the [revenue generated] for the Common School Construction Fund helps to offset taxes in local communities for helping to pay for the construction of schools for local communities.”

Quintessence grows on about 300 acres. The vineyard strives to get 40 tons of fruit an acre.

Additionally, the property itself can become more valuable when leased out. When it comes to Quintessence, they took a bare piece of land and turned it into a crown jewel of a property — increasing the value by an 100 fold from when DNR initially bought it in the 1990s.

“The asset value for the department has increased remarkably,” Koph said. “The Shaw’s are good stewards of the land. They take good care of that property, and we like folks who take good care of [the] ground like it’s their own, and they do a great job of that.”

Workers wait for macro-bins, where they will dump their hand-picked grapes. The macro-bins are weighed, and then the fruit is shipped to wineries.

Quintessence just wrapped up its 18th fall harvest with nearly 1,000 tons of grapes hand picked from the vine. Trucks bring the fruit over the Cascades to wineries, and they create full-bodied cabernets, merlots, and syrahs.

It’s wine that’s not only good for happy hour, but it’s good for Washington.

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10/19/2018 Klondike Fire Update (Klondike Fire Wildfire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 19, 2018 - 8:30am
Klondike Fire West Zone – Due to the reduced danger to homes, the Sheriff made an additional evacuation reduction yesterday. All residents on Spud Road west of the Illinois River will move from Level 3 (GO) to Level 2 (BE SET). Level 3 (GO) will remain in effect for all of Oak Flat Road, Old House and all residents south of the 33 (Agness) Road from the Illinois River Bridge to the Coon Rock Bridge. All other areas currently in a Level 2 (BE SET) will remain in a Level 2 at this time.With the decreased threat to structures, an additional Oregon State Fire Marshal structural protection task force has been released to protect their home community. Three structural task forces remain to patrol and protect local homes both day and night.Additional wildland fire suppression personnel have arrived over the past few days increasing the total number of fire personnel to 614. Many of these are hand crews who will directly engage the fire. Four type 1 (heavy) helicopters continue making water...

Additional Reductions in Evacuation Levels - Klondike Fire West Zone (Klondike Fire Wildfire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 18, 2018 - 4:25pm
Updated Evacuation Information Effective October 18, 2018 at 5:00 pm. Evacuation levels will be reduced for the following location: All residences on Spud Road on the west side of the Illinois River will move from Level 3 (GO) to Level 2 (BE SET). Level 3 (GO) will remain in effect for all of Oak Flat Road and all residents south of the Agness (33) Road from the Illinois River Bridge to the Coon Rock Bridge. All other areas currently in a Level 2 (BE SET) will remain in a Level 2 at this time. These changes are due to the fire behavior and suppression efforts. There is still a great deal of fire suppression efforts and structure preparedness going on with teams from the Fire Incident Management, CFPA, State Fire Marshal and local fire agencies. The Curry County Sheriff’s Office will continue to provide patrol in the closed areas.

10/18/18 Klondike Fire Update (Klondike Fire Wildfire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 18, 2018 - 2:52pm
Klondike Fire West Zone –Due to a decreased threat to structures, the Sheriff has made the following evacuation level reduction; the north side of the 33 Road from Spud Road to Coon Rock Bridge will move from Level 3 (GO) to Level 2 (BE SET). This change only affects the residences and businesses on the north side of the 33 Road (Agness Road) including Agness RV Park and Cougar Lane Lodge. All other areas remain the same. With the decreased threat to structures in the area noted above, one Oregon State Fire Marshal structural task force has been released to return to their home community. 4 structural task forces remain to patrol and protect structures both day and night. Additional wildland fire suppression resources are continuing to arrive. These personnel will be looking for every opportunity to attack the fire directly. Three type 1 (heavy) helicopters will continue making water drops on areas of active fire. An isolated lift in the inversion layer made the...

North Fork John Day Ranger District implements prescribed burn (2018 Umatilla NF Prescribed Fire Prescribed Fire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 18, 2018 - 11:01am
Fire management officials on the North Fork John Day Ranger District are implementing a 1,000 acre prescribed burn within the Meadowbrook FT0 D and G burn units, located southwest from Dale, Oregon and north of Meadowbrook Summit. The burn units are on the 3963 Rd in the Hinton Creek drainage. Smoke may be visible along Highway 395. The Meadowbrook prescribed burn is anticipated to take 5 day to complete and primarily consists of grass, open pine, and some juniper. The objective of the burn is to improve foraging habitat for big game, reduce long-term wildfire risk through reductions in existing fuel loading, and to restore the ecological functions of a fire adapted ecosystem to the area. Hunters and forest visitors are encouraged to plan ahead and avoid the area during prescribed burning activities. Additional information about this prescribed burn is available by visiting the Umatilla National Forest’s new prescribed fire interactive map. This map displays burning...

10/18/18 Klondike Fire Update (Klondike Fire Wildfire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 18, 2018 - 9:40am
Klondike Fire West Zone –Yesterday, fire containment lines were improved and extended along the fire’s perimeter. Fire crews also worked aggressively to contain the 12 spot fires that were created by last weekend’s wind event. At this time 8 of the 12 have line around them and work is ongoing on the others. Restoration efforts continued; these efforts included road repair, and hazard tree removal. The structural protection task forces remain on scene protecting threatened homes day and night. These resources will stay within the community until fire command determines that the threat has decreased to the extent that the fire can be handled by local resources working with wildland crews. Evacuation levels remain the same, however they are being constantly evaluated by the Sheriff with information and advice provided by fire personnel. Weather/Fire Behavior: Over the next two days, winds will increase slightly to 8 mph with gusts to 13 mph on ridgetops. This is...

Community Meeting in Agness For Klondike Fire West Zone (Klondike Fire Wildfire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 17, 2018 - 3:45pm
A community meeting for the Klondike Fire West Zone will be held on Friday October 19th, at 2 pm at the Old Library in Agness. The meeting will be filmed and posted on Facebook, YouTube, and Inciweb. All are welcome to attend.

Reduction in Evacuation Levels - Klondike Fire West Zone (Klondike Fire Wildfire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 17, 2018 - 2:56pm
Effective October 17, 2018 at 1:00 pm. Evacuation levels will be reduced for the following location: The North side of the 33 Road (Agness Road) from Spud Road to Coon Rock Bridge will move from Level 3 (GO) to Level 2 (BE SET). This change only affects the Residences and Businesses on the North side of the 33 Road (Agness Road) including Agness RV Park and Cougar Lane Lodge. All other Areas remain the same. These changes are due to the fire behavior and suppression efforts. There is still a great deal of fire suppression efforts and structure preparedness going on with teams from the Fire Incident Management, CFPA, State Fire Marshal and local fire agencies. The Curry County Sheriff’s Office will continue to provide patrol in the closed areas.

10/17/18 Klondike Fire Update (Klondike Fire Wildfire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 17, 2018 - 10:04am
Klondike Fire West Zone –Yesterday, fire containment lines were improved and extended along the fire’s perimeter. Fire crews also worked aggressively to contain the 12 spot fires that were created by last weekend’s wind event. At this time 8 of the 12 have line around them and work is ongoing on the others. Restoration efforts continued; these efforts included road repair, and hazard tree removal. The structural protection task forces remain on scene protecting threatened homes day and night. These resources will stay within the community until fire command determines that the threat has decreased to the extent that the fire can be handled by local resources working with wildland crews. Evacuation levels remain the same, however they are being constantly evaluated by the Sheriff with information and advice provided by fire personnel. Weather/Fire Behavior: Over the next two days, winds will increase slightly to 8 mph with gusts to 13 mph on ridgetops. This is unlikely to...

10/16/18 Klondike SPANISH Update (Klondike Fire Wildfire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 16, 2018 - 6:56pm
Incendio Klondite. Zona Oeste. – El personal del Incendio esta enfocando todos sus esfuerzos en asegurar que los fuegos iniciados por los vientos el Domingo pasado, no hayan causado ningun dano en las casas en las areas de Oak Flats, Spud Road y Agness. Los encargados del Incendio estiman que la presencia del viento el pasado Domingo dio como resultado un aumento de 5,000 acres en el incendio al Oeste de las lineas primarias de contencion. Para estas areas mencionadas, permanece en efecto el Nivel #3 de evacuacion mientras los bomberos y maquinarias pesadas trabajan en la construccion y en el enlace de nuevas lineas de contencion y de las ya existentes. Las cinco tareas estructurales del Marshal de Incendios en el Estado de Oregon que arrivo el dia de ayer, se han dividido en grupos de trabajo de dia y de noche para asegurar la proteccion de las viviendas en el area de evacuacion. Estos recursos incluyen 20 camiones de bomberos y 5 cisternas con bomberos pertenecientes a 33...

Community Meeting in Gold Beach For Klondike Fire West Zone (Klondike Fire Wildfire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 16, 2018 - 1:07pm
A community meeting will be held today in the Curry Showcase at the Curry County Fairgrounds at 2:00pm. All are welcome to attend.

Engineers Completing Survey Work for Road Storm-Proofing (Miles Fire BAER Burned Area Emergency Response)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 16, 2018 - 10:25am
Engineers from the Umpqua National Forest are completing survey work in the burned areas to use in preparing a contract for road storm-proofing, culvert modifications, and upgrades to culverts. This work is to be completed by the end of November. Other ongoing actions include purchase of road signs that warn of potential dangers from the 2018 fires. This work is outlined in the Burned Area Emergency Response assessment for the South Umpqua Complex fires: Miles, Columbus and Snowshoe. Full implementation of the BAER treatments will be complete within one year of containment of the fires. The complete BAER reports and treatments maps can be found at: https://www.fs.usda.gov/land/umpqua/landmanagement

10/16/18 Klondike Fire Update (Klondike Fire Wildfire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 16, 2018 - 9:58am
Klondike Fire West Zone – Fire personnel focused all efforts to ensure that Sunday’s wind driven spot fires did not damage any of the homes in the Oak Flats, Spud Road and Agness area. Fire managers estimate that the weekend wind event resulted in approximately 5,000 acres of new growth to the west of the primary containment lines. Level 3 evacuations remain in effect for these areas while fire crews and engines work to construct and link together new and existing containment lines. The Oregon State Fire Marshal’s five structural task forces that arrived yesterday have split into day and night shifts to ensure that all homes under evacuation are protected. These resources include twenty engines and five water tenders with firefighters from thirty-three different fire agencies from across the state. Fire behavior moderated significantly yesterday as the 30 mph winds over the weekend diminished significantly, allowing fire firefighters to attack spot fires directly....

‘Fire Storm’ 27 years ago today in eastern Washington raised prevention awareness

WA DNR News - October 16, 2018 - 9:09am

Twenty-seven years ago today, gale-force winds combined with dry and unseasonably warm weather combined to ignite the Fire Storm in Spokane County. It was called ‘Fire Storm’ because that’s exactly what took place. On October 16, 1991, wind gusts of up to 62 miles per hour were recorded in eastern Washington. Within hours, 92 wildfires had started — approximately 90 percent of them due to the gale-force winds that snapped power lines or pushed trees into power lines.

Most of the homes lost to wildfire in the following days were in what we call the wildland urban interface, where homes and forest intermix. There was one fatality during the fire and 114 homes and numerous other structures were destroyed. Population growth in wildland urban interfaces is a major reason that wildfires have become more disastrous.

Lessons learned
Many homeowners affected by the Fire Storm of 1991 were caught with a lack of knowledge about the wildfire risks where they lived. As a result, the National Fire Protection Association developed a program, Firewise, to help homeowners protect themselves and their property from wildfire. Since then, dozens of communities in eastern and western Washington state have qualified as Firewise communities because they took steps to reduce wildfire risks.

The two largest risks for homes during wildfires are:

  • A flammable roof, vulnerable to the wind-carried embers during a wildfire
  • Vegetation close to a house that can ignite and generate heat or flames that burn siding or other parts of the structure

The legacies of Fire Storm include the establishment of the State Mobilization Process that is under the authority of the Washington State Patrol and a greater awareness of the problems associated with people moving into the wildland urban interface.

Quick facts about Fire Storm 1991
Maximum wind gust: 62 mph
Homes destroyed: 114
Acres burned: 35,000
Homes threatened: 511
Separate fires: 92
Largest single fire: 13,840 acres
Firefighters responding: 4,000
Fire engines responding: 400
Fatalities: 1
9-1-1 calls received, first 24 hours: 3,000

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Pomeroy Ranger District implements activites fuels and pile burning (2018 Umatilla NF Prescribed Fire Prescribed Fire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 16, 2018 - 8:51am
Fire management officials on the Pomeroy Ranger District will be implementing activities fuels and pile burning over the next couple weeks.The objective is to reduce activity slash and prepare the ground for natural and artificial regeneration. These units are located in various locations in the South George Timber Sale area (South Park 22 and South Park 40). Units range in size from 20 to 60 acres. The majority of smoke will be visible on the day of ignition and decrease dramatically the following day. Smoldering and lingering smoke will persist for the next several days.Additional information about this prescribed burn is available by visiting the Umatilla National Forest’s new prescribed fire interactive map. This map displays burning activities and is available at https://tinyurl.com/y8b433th. (Note: only piles within timber sale units will appear on the interactive map, piles may be burned in other areas and those areas will not appear on the map). The interactive map allows...

10/15/18 Klondike Fire Update (Klondike Fire Wildfire)

Inciweb Articles OR - October 15, 2018 - 4:34pm
Klondike Fire UpdateOctober 15, 2018 – 12:00 p.m.Eric Knerr, Incident Commander Jody Prummer, Deputy ICInciweb Information: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5998/Facebook: TaylorCreek Fire and Klondike Fire Information - HomeKlondike West Fire Information 541-247-6789 Email: Taylorcreekfire2018@gmail.comKlondike Fire West Zone – Unusually warmer temperatures, low humidity and gusty winds across the fire yesterday afternoon caused an approximately 2000 acre spot fire near the North Fork of Indigo Creek. The Sheriff’s Office, in concurrence with fire officials, quickly made the determination that evacuations were appropriate for residents in the areas of Oak Flat, Spud Road, and along the 33 road in Agness and residents north of the Rogue River.Northwest Incident Management Team 7 (NWIMT7) assumed command of the October 14, 2018 at 8:00 p.m.Today’s Activities: Crews are on site, engaged in suppression activity. Additional resources have been ordered, including aircraft,...

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